Chiropractic + Naturopathic Doctor

Features Education Profession
Editor’s Note: February 2007


January 4, 2008
By David Stubbs

Topics

Mylar mirrors on the cover of Time magazine in late December were intended to literally reflect the Person of the Year, a title that was surprisingly conferred upon each and every reader.

Mylar mirrors on the cover of Time magazine in late December were intended to literally reflect the Person of the Year, a title that was surprisingly conferred upon each and every reader.  In the new Internet digital democracy, with the popularity of YouTube and other similar sites, it’s all about how individuals decide to relate to their world.

If you haven’t yet done so, you might check out www.youtube.com.  Type in “chiropractic” and you will discover the Ontario Chiropractic Association’s 2001 Early Man TV commercial, an excerpt of Homer Simpson’s chiropractic shenanigans, video announcements advertising the grand opening of clinics, and much more … all free, uncensored, uncontrolled, and very much out there.

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External interaction is an ongoing theme in chiropractic, as evidenced in some inside stories.  For example, chiropractic participation in the United Nations’ Bone and Joint Decade has helped to ensure an emphasis on interprofessional collaboration in musculoskeletal health care.

On the local level, Dr. Peter Moore describes how, on Friday afternoons during the winter, he heads to the arena to play hockey with physician friends.  Shinny is not only fun and invigorating but it permits this Ontario chiropractor to build productive personal and professional relationships in a natural and practical way.

The editor-in-chief of the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Dr. Claire Johnson, has called for papers for a special global theme issue that will focus on poverty and human development, a departure for the prestigious and scholarly JMPT.  While the chiropractic profession needs to further its research and make ongoing political gains, it is also important, says Johnson, “to demonstrate to the rest of the world that we are dedicated to assisting with global health, wellness, and humanity issues.”

On another note, a strident memory echo from university days purports that “there is nothing as practical as a good theory.”  In this issue, we look into the foundational theory of chiropractic.

Chosen by readers – many of them exercising their digital democratic rights by voting online – Dr. Peter Amlinger has been named Canadian Chiropractor magazine’s 2006 Independent Chiropractor of the Year.  In a question-and-answer interview, he explains what it means to him to be a “principled” chiropractor.  “It is possible and desirable,” says Dr. Amlinger, a man who endeavours to walk his talk, “to merge philosophy with science.”

Lastly, consider Whitehorse chiropractor Dr. Jean-François Latour’s summertime routine in the Land of the Midnight Sun.  After work, one day a week, he launches his canoe in the Yukon River and paddles home.  The next morning he bicycles 30 kilometres back to town where he has left his truck.

At the end of the day in his world, there is time to catch a few salmon for a late dinner, and to enjoy a cup of tea by the fire, sometimes with patients.

And how’s your commute?


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