Chiropractic + Naturopathic Doctor

Features Business Management
Editor’s Note: October 2010


October 5, 2010
By Maria DiDanieli

Topics

Over the past three years, I have had the privilege to meet, and work with, a number of chiropractic practitioners who are immersed in busy and fulfilling careers – DCs who have a range of responsibilities that include hands-on patient care; serving chiropractic on a variety of boards, committees and associations;  teaching; and volunteering in the community.

Over the past three years, I have had the privilege to meet, and work with, a number of chiropractic practitioners who are immersed in busy and fulfilling careers – DCs who have a range of responsibilities that include hands-on patient care; serving chiropractic on a variety of boards, committees and associations;  teaching; and volunteering in the community.

It seems achieving the state of being so busy is founded on the DC applying his/her own self in an active and committed manner to each endeavour, never leaving to chance, or to peripheral elements, that which his/her unique touch could impact more effectively. For example, although successful DCs may, in a manner that is aligned with their purpose, allow tools or services to assist with various elements of practice or office management, they understand that any one of these cannot, in itself, be the magic carpet to success. Nothing can replace, much less beat, the power of skilled hands working in tandem with knowledge, experience and personal spirit.

Advertisement

Don’t get me wrong – the products and services available to any profession are indispensable for the growth and development of that discipline. New technologies can assist in achieving formidable results in any occupation; continuing education can lead to new heights of professional maturity; practice advancement resources and events can provide that little push required to bring your career to new levels.

But accomplishing that which you aspire to as a DC – more patient visits, better treatment outcomes, uptake of your product or service, respect from your profession and beyond – comes mostly from defining your footprint and, then, planting it firmly into every aspect of each activity you involve yourself in.

In this, our practice management issue for 2010, we will examine this notion further. While bringing you informative feature articles and news about various practice elements, our contributors never lose sight of the fact that the single most important thing you can offer to your patients and the public is your focus, knowledge, skills and energy as a chiropractor, and that doing so is, in fact, essential to sustainable practice growth, as well as for the growth of the profession as a whole.

Though definitions of “success” and “fulfilled” may vary somewhat between individuals, this notion that an exciting career, a solid practice, and, indeed, the future of chiropractic depends on DCs trusting, and utilizing, their own power while relying on the skills and concepts they have learned as chiropractors is a noticeable thread in the discussions I continue to engage in with doctors of chiropractic. It’s also one of the reasons that I referred, above, to the opportunity to work with DCs as a privilege.

Bien à vous,


Print this page

Related



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*