Chiropractic + Naturopathic Doctor

Features Education Profession
Editor’s Note: July/August 2008


August 15, 2008
By Maria DiDanieli

Topics

Michel Foucault wrote, “Liberty is
the vital, unfettered force of truth.” Many years before Foucault wrote
this, Boissy d’Anglas, said, “…liberty, radiant with glory, can only
survive when surrounded by all the light that can enlighten men . . .
.”

Michel Foucault wrote, “Liberty is the vital, unfettered force of truth.” Many years before Foucault wrote this, Boissy d’Anglas, said, “…liberty, radiant with glory, can only survive when surrounded by all the light that can enlighten men . . . .”

Since its inception by D.D. Palmer, chiropractic has struggled, against political, social and medical elements for the freedom to exist, and grow, both in North America and abroad. Where that liberty has been granted – through academic, political and/or legal channels – chiropractic knowledge has advanced exponentially. In turn, chiropractors all over the world have shared their art, science and philosophy with patients, politicians, lawyers, medical doctors, etc., in an effort to convey why, and how, chiropractic works. This has served to uphold the freedom to continue delving into the finer points of these “whys and hows” in order to reach an even greater depth of understanding of chiropractic, for both practitioners and the public.

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Achieving the liberty that has, in effect, unfettered chiropractic truth has not been easy, and has resulted in DCs all over the world being criticized, or worse, for their efforts.  And, in some countries, such liberty still does not exist. But individuals and chiropractic organizations are working to help DCs in various countries achieve recognition with their governments – thus making it legal to practice chiropractic – and to promote the profession within those countries. 

Canadian DCs, organizations and chiropractic colleges are recognized as leaders in the processes which are making this international growth possible. The efforts, in our Canadian schools – both CMCC and UQTR – as well as by the Canadian Chiropractic Research Foundation, to enter into university-based chiropractic research are making it possible to back up practice with scientific evidence.

The energy of Canadian DCs, who tirelessly treat as many people as possible, through mission initiatives, international sports, and private practices in areas where chiropractic is sparse or non-existent, or who contribute by publishing and teaching in areas of the world where chiropractic knowledge is wanting, is commendable. And the efforts, by organizations such as the Canadian-based World Federation of Chiropractic (WFC), to support the profession by working with foreign governments – and with the World Health Organization on various seminal documents – are bearing much fruit and ensuring that high quality chiropractic is delivered by properly trained practitioners.

In this issue, we honour the work that our chiropractors are doing around the world. We will hear from Canadian graduates, from both programs, who are currently working in various countries. As well, the WFC has offered an update on the profession globally.  Finally, we are grateful to Dr. Gerard Clum – who has just completed his term as president of the WFC – for sharing his view of the Canadian contribution to chiropractic.

These are only a few of the features you will find in this issue. Please, don’t forget to visit our website, at www.cndoctor.ca , to view all of these stories, plus our web-exclusive reports, news, blogs and our latest poll.

Boissy d’Anglas also wrote, “Make other nations tributaries not of your political authority, nor of your government, but of your talents and your knowledge . . . .”  I invite you to join us, in this issue, as we celebrate Canadian leadership in the development of the tributaries of chiropractic knowledge and practice around the globe.

Bien à vous.


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