Chiropractic + Naturopathic Doctor

Features Business Management
Editor’s note: October 2009


October 7, 2009
By Maria DiDanieli

Topics

Change. It comes to all of us, throughout our lives, and it comes in a variety
of forms. We’ve all experienced such wonderful transformations as going
from being a child to a teenager to an adult, and from a student to a
professional.

Change.

It comes to all of us, throughout our lives, and it comes in a variety of forms. We’ve all experienced such wonderful transformations as going from being a child to a teenager to an adult, and from a student to a professional. Many of us have seen our life evolve from existence as a single person into a union with another individual and/or into that unbelievable realm of being a parent.

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Within each of these incarnations of our selves, there may also be opportunities for change to occur. As a professional, one may choose to alter the direction, or content, of the work one already does. Another life change will occur when one is ready to leave one’s work, either in the form of retirement, relocation, or transition into another career.

All of the aforementioned alterations may hold uncertainties. However, each is generally anticipated with promise for new experiences, learning and a continuation of a productive and full life.

What happens when a transition involves the decline of the individual’s productivity, as they have known it, either temporarily or permanently? That is, what happens if you become sick – I refer to critical and/or long-term illness – or if you are hurt enough that you cannot work? These are situations that people look to with apprehension, not only for their own well-being but for the viability of their professional situation, and the survival of their families or other dependants.

It’s a scary thought, for sure. But the outlook, for each aspect of one’s life that is touched by absence from work, does not have to be bleak. For DCs, there are formidable rehabilitation and back-to-work programs available. Furthermore, with open and honest foresight, your practice and dependants will not be without protection, if you cannot work. Even if the bottom line becomes that you must permanently reduce your work capacity, or cannot work anymore, there is still promise that you can tackle this sort of life change with an appreciable degree of dignity and success.

I welcome you to our annual practice management issue wherein, this year, Canadian Chiropractor presents its readers with a frank discussion about the various types of change that DCs may undertake, or face, within practice. Katerina Paganos, in partnership with the Canadian Chiropractic Association, talks about critical illness and disability as it pertains to the DC. Lloyd Manning talks about selling your practice when retiring or phasing out, whatever the reason. Dr. Rhonda Mostyn talks about undertaking a redirection of your practice. Paul and Nancy Philip talk about the importance of working with a financial advisor who is qualified to assist with the financial activities that are necessary in the event of critical illness or injury situations.

It is within the most difficult human situations or transitions that one can achieve one’s greatest personal victories.  But one can’t always do that alone.  Furthermore, having strategies in place to provide for the transient uncertainty that may accompany life’s challenges can optimize many aspects of the outcome. With this issue, we hope to initiate a dialogue of planning for DCs, especially as it pertains to those aspects of practice that, if properly managed, can make the challenge of any transition easier to overcome.

Bien à vous,


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